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Addition and Subtraction of Decimals 9 - 11.

This Powerpoint resource (consisting of 46 interactive slides plus printables) enables pupils to recognise why answers are wrong. This can often be due to a careless error that a pupil has overlooked since they are not asking themselves, ‘Is this answer reasonable and sensible?’ For this reason, it is useful to look at questions and answers and ask pupils to explain why particular answers cannot be correct, without carrying out the actual calculation. That is the focus of this PowerPoint presentation. It is worth removing any writing materials, including whiteboards, so that pupils cannot work out the actual calculation but have to rely on reasoning and estimates they can complete in their heads.

Addition and Subtraction of Decimals 9 - 11.     

 This PowerPoint resource focuses on working efficiently. Using standard algorithms isn’t always the most efficient way to calculate an answer.

 Allowing pupils to discuss their methods reminds pupils about the most efficient ways to calculate different questions. When working with larger numbers, it can be more efficient to use the standard algorithms. However, whichever method pupils use, it is worth getting pupils used to using an estimate to check their answer against.

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Practise addition and subtraction of decimals using these twenty card maths trails for 9 to 11-year-olds.

Pupils can work in pairs using number sense to decide how best to perform the calculation. 

Pairs can start at any point on the trail since the cards form a loop where the answer to one calculation can be found on a different card.  

Suggested methods and solutions are included. 

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Practise addition and subtraction of integers using these twenty card maths trails for 9 to 11-year-olds.

Pupils can work in pairs using number sense to decide how best to perform the calculation. 

Pairs can start at any point on the trail since the cards form a loop where the answer to one calculation can be found on a different card.  

Suggested methods and solutions are included. 

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Addition and Subtraction of Integers 9 - 11.

This Powerpoint resource (consisting of 46 interactive slides plus printables) enables pupils to recognise why answers are wrong. This can often be due to a careless error that a pupil has overlooked since they are not asking themselves, ‘Is this answer reasonable and sensible?’ For this reason, it is useful to look at questions and answers and ask pupils to explain why particular answers cannot be correct, without carrying out the actual calculation. That is the focus of this PowerPoint presentation. It is worth removing any writing materials, including whiteboards, so that pupils cannot work out the actual calculation but have to rely on reasoning and estimates they can complete in their heads.

Addition and Subtraction of Integers 9 - 11.     

 This PowerPoint resource focuses on working efficiently. Using standard algorithms isn’t always the most efficient way to calculate an answer.

 Allowing pupils to discuss their methods reminds pupils about the most efficient ways to calculate different questions. When working with larger numbers, it can be more efficient to use the standard algorithms. However, whichever method pupils use, it is worth getting pupils used to using an estimate to check their answer against.

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This Powerpoint resource (consisting of 52 interactive slides plus printables) enables pupils to recognise two-digit numbers before focusing on understanding that the first digit represents groups of 10. 

Number line activities are used to emphasise where numbers are positioned in relation to each other. 

Grouping into tens shows pupils how this helps when counting and how it relates to the representation of two-digit numbers. 

Partitioning activities are included which enable flexibility when calculating.

Pupils count from any two-digit number (e.g. 23) and jump backward or forward in 10s since this helps them to see the digits pattern in the sequences.

This Powerpoint resource (consisting of 157 interactive slides plus printables) links addition and subtraction using visual images including bar models and number lines which can be used as pupils progress to larger numbers. Once pupils understand the link, they can be more flexible with calculating; lots of us add rather than subtract even when faced with a subtraction calculation; bar models are useful for showing this. Vertical and horizontal number lines are included due to their usefulness when adding and subtracting with larger numbers. There is also an emphasis on spotting patterns. Pupils of all abilities seem to be able to spot patterns and this should be encouraged; allowing pupils to share what they have spotted with the rest of the class encourages more pattern spotting!

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This Powerpoint resource (consisting of 83 interactive slides plus printables) explores multiplication and division for younger pupils and emphasises the links between the two operations.

Patterns in multiples of 2, 5 and 10 are linked to the number line.

Arrays are introduced to move pupils on from repeated addition.

Doubling and halving are used to introduce scaling.

Grouping and equal sharing are experienced through context problems.

For a MAC version, click on the image on the right.

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Despite practising multiplication facts, there is still some uncertainty, so how do you get pupils to be able to use the facts efficiently when calculating? While there are some pupils who can learn multiplication facts relatively easily, this Powerpoint resource (consisting of 64 interactive slides plus printables) nurtures their understanding which will help them to develop fluency when working with multiplication.

Images of arrays and the multiplication grid are used. Patterns and links within multiple groups are uncovered. Pupils work with these patterns and links - as well as the commutative property (5 x 7 = 7 x 5) - to construct a multiplication grid. Pupils explore how facts can be derived from other known facts to reduce reliance on memory alone.

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One of the reasons for some pupils' confusion when learning fractions is that they consider the numerators and denominators as whole numbers rather than as representing the relationship between the part and the whole. In this PowerPoint (consisting of 9 interactive slides plus printables) there is an emphasis on recognising the whole unit and the relationship between the parts and the whole unit.

Sometimes, shapes and single pizzas are the predominant images used when working on the recognition of fractions, so these activities include multiple pizzas as the whole unit, paper folding - which can then be related to fractions on a number line - and the use of counters as an introduction to fractions of quantities.  

This interactive Powerpoint (consisting of 46 interactive slides plus printables) helps pupils to compare fractions. When asked to compare or order fractions, pupils sometimes automatically think about finding common denominators, and in some cases, this is what is needed. However, there are also situations where pupils can use reasoning, such as when the fractions have the same denominator, the same numerator or can easily be compared to 1 or ½. Using fraction circles, fraction strips, fraction walls and number lines can help pupils to understand these ideas initially before moving towards working abstractly with fractions once they understand why a method works by using visual images.

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This interactive Powerpoint (consisting of 38 interactive slides plus printables) helps pupils to understand equivalent fractions. If pupils are considering numerators and denominators as positive integers rather than as representing the relationship between the part and the whole, this can be a problem for equivalent fractions since pupils can struggle to understand that fractions containing different numerators and denominators can be equivalent since they see the numbers as different.

Using fraction circles, fraction strips, fraction walls and number lines helps pupils to see the connections between the different fractions and their relation to each other and the whole. 

This interactive Powerpoint (consisting of 18 interactive slides plus printables) helps pupils in lower KS2 to add and subtract fractions.

Adding and subtracting fractions is not something that pupils are likely to experience very often in real life (we would be more likely to use their decimal equivalents), so this is a rather abstract topic.

It is best to start with manipulatives then link this use to examples without manipulatives.

Statements are used to provoke discussion since pupils need to explain why they agree or disagree with the statement or give examples of the circumstances when the statement is true or false.

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This interactive Powerpoint (consisting of 36 interactive slides plus printables) helps pupils in upper  KS2 to add and subtract fractions.

In Upper KS2 pupils add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions. Pupils should be familiar with equivalent fractions before working on adding and subtracting fractions with different denominators.

Statements are used to provoke discussion since pupils need to explain why they agree or disagree with the statement or give examples of the circumstances when the statement is true or false.

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This interactive Powerpoint (consisting of 57 interactive slides plus printables) helps pupils to understand area and perimeter. This resource initially focuses on the ideas of area being the covering of space in two dimensions and perimeter as being the boundary around an area of space. Pupils are encouraged to use various units for the measure of area, prior to appreciating why squares are the unit of measure that is commonly used. Once pupils are comfortable with these ideas, they are encouraged to find areas by considering the number of squares in a row and the number of rows, thus linking the idea of area to multiplication. Ultimately this will lead to the use of a formula for calculating areas of rectangles, followed by the calculation of the area of triangles and parallelograms.

This Powerpoint resource (consisting of 70 interactive slides plus printables) builds on pupils' familiarity with pattern using sequence patterns as a starting point for generalization. As letters are introduced, when finding general rules for a growing pattern, they will have many possible values thus emphasising the use of letters as variables. Problems are used to allow the application of generalising in a range of situations. Visual sequences are created according to a given rule. Sequences with a constant difference are linked to multiple sequences and graphed to show relationships. Pupils continue a range of sequences using cubes or square paper while using tables to explore emerging patterns. 

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Get into the festive spirit while providing your students with the opportunity to apply reasoning to maths tasks in the days leading up to Christmas. They can be used at the start of each day, or when there is a convenient slot. Alternatively, they can be incorporated into the daily maths lesson. Paired work is encouraged since the discussions that result when working together help to clarify students’ thoughts and ideas. 

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This presentation includes twenty-four activities that include games and problems such as comparing pupil lengths to reindeer lengths, sharing out buttons when building snowmen, making geometric tree decorations and how to collect and show data on favourite reindeer names. 

 

This set of activities is suitable for 5 to 7-year-olds.

This presentation includes twenty-four activities that include games and problems such as figuring out the best deal when shopping for presents, comparing the heights of huge Christmas trees in cities around the world, making geometric tree decorations and helping Santa to figure out the mixed-up numbering in some roads so he can deliver presents.

 

This set of activities is suitable for 7 to 9-year-olds.

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This presentation includes twenty-four activities that include games and problems such as comparing pupil heights to reindeer lengths, the speed that Santa travels, party planning and which table to sit at in order to get the most chocolate. 

 

This set of activities is suitable for 9 to 11 year olds.

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